Stories


Darragh Christie, 24 April 2016 · # · · Comment

24 April 1916: The Easter Rising – Éirí Amach na Cásca

Schoolmaster, poet and linguist Patrick Pearce (Pádraig Anraí Mac Piarais) stood on the steps of the General Post Office in Dublin, on the 24th April 1916, and read out an impassioned plea and proclamation.

IRISHMEN AND IRISHWOMEN. In the name of God and the dead generations from which she receives her old tradition of nationhood, Ireland, through us summons our children to her flag and strikes for her freedom..

As he did so strategic points around the city were occupied by the Irish volunteers, and the Irish Citizen Army led by James Connolly (Séamas Ó Conghaile).

Read more


Donna, 22 April 2016 · # · · Comment [1]

Faces in the Crowd go to war

Battle of Mont St. Quentin, Fred Leist 1918 (AGNSW)

Among the many residents encountered in the research for this latest exhibition – Faces in the Crowd – were some local official war artists including the Bulletin artists Henry Fullwood and Frederick Leist.

Fullwood lived in Mosman for a year in the late 19th century and Leist lived in Mosman from the 1920s.

Read more


Darragh Christie, 14 February 2016 · # · · Comment [1]

Mosman’s boy mascot company commander and the Valentine’s Day mutiny

In February 1916, Patrick Gordon (“Bill”) Taylor had been stationed at the AIF Liverpool training camps for over a month. Like other lads his age, he had been caught up in the enthusiasm to sign up and “do his bit”, so as to not miss out on what was thought to be at the time the greatest adventure of his generation.


Liverpool camp, October 1916. (Image: AWM C01206)

This was the life he had chosen; and he could only assume it would get him a lot closer to the action than his parents’ plans for him to study medicine at Sydney University.

But camp life at Liverpool was to fall short of expectations for both this 18 year old, wide-eyed, second lieutenant from Raglan Street, Mosman, and for the army of volunteer recruits, from all over Sydney, and from all types of backgrounds.

“Bill” Taylor recalls…

Read more


Bernard de Broglio, 18 January 2016 · # · · Comment

Lucky 13: Dibbs at the front


Smith’s Weekly, 1 December 1923, p. 26

‘Most Expensive Airman of the A.I.F.’ said popular tabloid Smith’s Weekly in 1923.

Mosman pilot Eric Dibbs reckoned he’d crashed 13 aircraft in his time with the flying corps. If the tale is a little tall in the retelling, who can begrudge a man who made it back from the Western Front?

He wasn’t an ace but took his chances over the trenches — and won.

Read more


Darragh Christie, 14 September 2015 · # · · Comment [1]

“That spirit of restlessness”: Charles Ulm (Jackson) enlists

Charles Ulm with his mother and father, 1914

One hundred years ago, today, a 15 year old Mosman boy signed up for the A.I.F. It was the start of an adventure that would make him a household name.

Read more